HISTORY

This turba was originally founded in 644/1246 after the death of Baraka Khan (al-Amir Husam al-Din Barka Khan) as a tomb for him and his sons. In the present building, no less than five different phases of construction are discernible; of these, two are Mamluk and one is Ottoman. One of the two Mamluk phases is datable between 663/1265 and 679/1280, and the other is dated by inscription 792/1390 when it was renovated and extended by Mohammad ibn Ahmad al-Ala'i. The full extent of these constructions is unknown, for only the facade of Tariq Bab al-Silsila survives. In 1900, the building was converted into a library named Khalidi Library (al-Maktaba al-Khalidyya).

ARCHITECTURE

The building is comprised of three distinct components: a small vaulted chamber in the south east corner of the complex, a room at the west end of the complex used as a Maktaba (library), and between these two, a courtyard with the tomb in it.

M.L.F.M.

Link to Glossary of Islamic Architecture

Paintings


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Burgoyne, M. H.,  Mamluk Jerusalem, An Architectural Study, The British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem, (1987). pp. 109-116.

Najm, R., Kunuz al-Quds, Amman (1983). pp.137-138.